Law school is not easy, and every student experiences it differently. Here are some tips on law school essentials. In addition to pulling from my own experience now as a 3L, I’ve included thoughts from some of my classmates.

What’s in your bag?

When we discuss professionalism in class, we associate it with preparedness. Here are some essentials to keep in your bag:

  1. Pens/pencils/highlighters: This goes without saying, but it is always good to have a few of these handy in your bag.
  2. Notebooks and loose paper: These are good for taking notes.
  3. Organization tools (binder, notebooks for each class, etc.): You will likely end up with several handouts or notes for each class. This helps keep them organized and easier to retrieve later.
  4. A planner/to do list: This helps keep track of your schedule and manage your time effectively.

Technology Essentials

This can really vary for each person depending on how comfortable they are with technology.
Continue Reading Now that you’ve been admitted to law school, what do you need?

Do you miss having a quiet place to study free from pets, kids, and noisy roommates? Are you preparing to take the bar and keep getting interrupted in the middle of a cram session? Normally, the McGeorge library would be the first place students turn to. However, with COVID-19 likely keeping much of the campus shuttered for the next few months (at least), students must now look to outside services. In Sacramento, there are many co-working spaces outside McGeorge that offer a quiet place for students to work alone or with small study groups.

One location that’s popular with current students is the aptly named co-working office, The Spot. Located on 12th Street and under a mile from Capitol Park, The Spot provides a quiet space for students and working professionals alike. Be sure to ask about the student rate for a monthly desk ($60/month), which isn’t advertised online.


Continue Reading A Study Space Away From Home

Part-Time Law Students

Being enrolled in law school as a part-time student is an experience unlike any other. Not only must you navigate the rigors of law school, but in all likelihood, you’ll also be balancing that with a full-time job. Add to that kids and a family for many students, and things can quickly feel overwhelming.

But

Months of studying, sleepless nights, and (probably) an unhealthy amount of caffeine is about to pay off. You survived your clinics and externships, you survived law school – one more test and you’ll be a certified lawyer. As you finish your preparations for the bar exam next week, just remember: You got this.

Hopefully you’ve

A big part of bar-study—and, quite frankly, law practice—is about managing stress and staying balanced.  It’s easy to forget to take care of yourself in the face of the million hours of contracts you’re supposed to be re-learning, but your wellness is actually a key component to passing the bar.  Regular sleep and a little

The Bar. Three years of law school and more loans than you may care to think about have culminated in this final test. However, the Bar is unlike any exam taken in undergrad or law school. You cannot approach it as “just another law exam”, which is why Bar review courses, including McGeorge’s PASS I